L1 and L2 Commands

From Nekochan
Revision as of 01:40, 31 December 2010 by Regan russell (Talk | contribs) (Moar appropriate category)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

L2 Commands

You can use all of the L2 controller commands to monitor and manage all of the devices (Origin 3000 series servers, Onyx 3000 graphics systems, Origin 300 servers, and Onyx 300 graphics systems) that include a hardware L2 controller. (You cannot use L2 controller commands with systems that do not include a hardware L2 controller.)

Commands are:
router|io|compute|otherautopower|apwr     config|cfg         connect            
date               demo               destination|dest   dhcpserver|dhcps   
env                fru                help|hlp           ip                 
l2dbg              l1                 l2                 l2dsp|l2display    
l2find             log                loopback           route              
nvram              ping               password|pw        pbay               
power|pwr          quit               rackid             reboot_l2          
reset|rst          select|sel         smp                serial             
multisys|msys      share              sysname            shell|!            
version|ver        <command>          

L1 Commands

You can use most, but not all, of the L1 controller commands to monitor and manage all devices (Origin 3000 series servers, Onyx 3000 graphics systems, Origin 300 servers, and Onyx 300 graphics systems). Table 3-1 lists the L1 controller commands and which devices each command supports.

Note: If you try to use an L1 controller command that is not available for a particular system or brick component, a message will inform you of this.




L1 Controller Command

  • autopower
  • brick
  • config
  • cpu
  • ctc
  • cti
  • date
  • debug
  • display
  • eeprom
  • env
  • fan
  • flash
  • help
  • history
  • ioport[a]
  • istat
  • junkbus
  • l1
  • l1dbg
  • leds
  • link
  • log
  • network
  • nmi
  • nvram reset
  • partdb
  • pbay
  • pci
  • pimm
  • port
  • power
  • reboot_l1
  • reset
  • router
  • security verify
  • select
  • serial
  • softreset
  • test
  • uart
  • usb
  • verbose
  • version



Applicable to

  • Origin 3000 Series Servers and Onyx 3000 Graphics Systems: C-brick
  • Origin 3000 Series Servers and Onyx 3000 Graphics Systems: I/O bricks
  • Origin 3000 Series Servers and Onyx 3000 Graphics Systems: R-brick
  • Origin 3000 Series Servers and Onyx 3000 Graphics Systems: Graphic Bricks
  • Origin 300 Servers and Onyx 300 Graphics Systems: Servers and Graphics Sys.
  • Origin 300 Servers and Onyx 300 Graphics Systems:
  • NUMAlink Module
  • Origin 300 Servers and Onyx 300 Graphics Systems:Graphics Bricks


Although some command supports I/O bricks, it is valid only for the I–, P–, and X–bricks.


Sending Commands to Specific Devices
You can use the <command> variable to send a specific command to particular devices. (Use the help command to get the list of the many commands that you can enter with <command>.) The following are some of the commands in which you can use <command> as a variable:

<command>

<ip> : <port> : <l1> <command>

<rack> . <slot> <command>

: <port> : <l1> <command>

<ip> <command>

rack <rng> slot <rng> <command>

Use these commands as follows:

Use <command> to send L1 or L2 commands to default destinations.

Use <ip> : <port> : <l1> <command> to send an L1 command to a specified L1 controller, to a specified port identified by a specified IP address.

Use <rack> . <slot> <command> to send a specified L1 controller command to an L1 controller located in a brick or server located in a specified slot of a specified rack.

Use : <port> : <l1> <command> to send a specified L1 controller command to a specified port on a specified L1 controller located on the local L2 controller.

Use <ip> <command> to send a specified L2 controller command to the L2 controller specified by the IP address.

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> <command> to send a specified L1 or L2 controller command to selected racks and slots. The <rng> variable specifies the rack number(s) and slot number(s).

When entering these commands, be aware of the following rules:

For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.

If no target is specified and <command> is an L2 controller command, it is executed on the local L2 controller only. If the L2 controller does not understand the command, it passes it on to all the L1 controllers in the default destination. (The destination command shows the default destinations.)

If the target is specified and <command> is an L2 controller command, it is executed on the targeted L2 controllers. If the command is not understood by the L2 controller, it passes on the command to all L1 controllers on the target list.

For overlapping L2 controller commands and L1 controller commands, precede the <command> with L1 to override the L2 interpretation.

L1 Controller Commands
The following subsections describe the L1 controller commands and command sets, which are listed alphabetically. Examples of output are included where applicable.

* (asterisk character)
Use * <command> to broadcast the command specified. For systems with a C–brick, a command that is broadcasted is sent to all of the bricks that are attached to the C-brick that issued the command. For systems that do not have a C-brick, a command that is broadcasted is sent to all systems connected to the system that issued the command. Example 3-1 shows sample output from the * version command.

Example 3-1. * version Command Output

001c07-L1>* version 
001c07:
L1 0.7.27 (Image A), Built 04/28/2000 13:06:43    [P1 support]
001i21:
L1 0.8.xx (Image B), Built 06/13/2000 09:54:32    [P1 support]


autopower
The following autopower command set enables, disables, and aborts the feature that enables the system to automatically power up if power is lost. The autopower command also displays the current autopower setting (see Example 3-2).

autopower

autopower on

autopower off

autopower abort

Example 3-2. autopower Command Output

001c20-L1>autopower
auto power on is disabled.


brick
The following brick command set provides the status of the brick and sets the brick location and type.

brick

brick type <str>

brick rack <rack number>

brick slot <slot number>

brick rackslot <rack number> <slot number>

brick partition none

brick partition <partition number>

        Note: For this command set, you can use bay or upos instead of slot, rs instead of rackslot, and part or p in the place of partition.

Use the brick command to determine the brick location and type. Example 3-3 shows sample output.

Example 3-3. brick Command Output

001c07-L1>brick
rack: 001 slot: 07 partition:0type: C source: EEPROM

Use brick rack <rack number> to set the rack number where the brick is located. Example 3-4 shows sample output.

Example 3-4. brick rack <rack number> Command Output

001c07-L1>brick rack 1
brick rack set to 001.

Use brick slot <slot number> to set the brick slot number in the rack. The variable <slot number> is a unit number from 01 to 39. Example 3-5 shows sample output.

Example 3-5. brick slot <slot number> Command Output

001c07-L1>brick slot 07
brick slot set to 07.

Use brick rackslot <rack number> <slot number> to set the brick rack and slot number. Example 3-6 shows sample output.

Example 3-6. brick rackslot <rack number> <slot number> Command Output

001c07-L1>brick rackslot 01 07
brick rack set to 01
brick slot set to 07

Use brick partition none to clear the brick partition number. Example 3-7 shows sample output.

Example 3-7. brick partition none Command Output

001c07-L1>brick partition none
brick partition cleared.

Use brick partition <partition> to set the brick partition number. Example 3-8 shows sample output.

Example 3-8. brick partition <partition> Command Output

001c07-L1>brick partition 1
brick partition set to 1.


config
Use the following config command set to view and reset L1 controller configuration information, and to check network interface (NI) ring configuration.

config

config verbose

config reset

config ring

        Note: For this command set, you can use cfg instead of config and v instead of verbose,

Use the config command to view the L1 controller configuration information. Example 3-9 shows sample output from the config command for an Origin 300 server, Origin 300 server with NUMAlink, or Onyx 300 graphics system.

Example 3-9. config Command Output

001c20-L1>config
0: - 001c20

Example 3-10 shows sample output from the config command for an Origin 3000 server or an Onyx 3000 graphics system.

Example 3-10. config Command Output

003c01-L1>config 
:0 - 003c01 
:1 - 004i01 
:2 - 002c01 
:3 - 001x01 
003c01-L1> 

In the output, the first number after the colon is the L1 index number. Table 3-2 lists the values of the L1 index for a C-brick and an R-brick. Only L1 index number 0 is valid for an R-brick.

Table 3-2. L1 Index Values for C-brick and R-brick

L1 Index

Name

Description

0

Local brick

The C-brick or R-brick that contains the L1 issuing the command.

1 
(applies to C–brick only)

Attached I/O brick

An I/O brick that connects to the local brick.

2 or 3
(applies to C–brick only)

Attached C-brick

A C-brick that connects to the local brick.

3 or 4
(applies to C–brick only)

I/O brick attached to the attached C-brick

An I/O brick that connects to a C-brick that connects to the local brick.

Table 3-3 lists the values of the L1 index for an I/O brick.

Table 3-3. L1 Index Values for I/O brick

L1 Index

Name

Description

0

Local brick

The I/O brick that contains the L1 issuing the command.

1

Attached C-brick on port A

A C-brick that connects to the local brick through port A.

2

Attached C-brick on port B

A C-brick that connects to the local brick through port B.

3

Attached C–brick on port C

A C–brick that connects to the local brick through port C.

4

Attached C–brick on port D

A C–brick that connects to the local brick through port D.

The number that follows the L1 index, after the dash, is the brick identification (for example, 003c01). The first three digits of the brick identification indicate the rack in which the brick resides. The fourth digit of the brick identification indicates the type of brick (see Table 3-4). The last two digits of the brick identification indicate the slot position in which the brick resides.

Table 3-4. Valid Brick Types

Type

Description

c

C-brick

i

I-brick

p

P-brick

r

R-brick

x

X-brick

n

N–brick

g

G–brick

?

Unknown brick type

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use config verbose to view an expanded view of the L1 controller configuration information.

Use config reset to reset the L1 controller configuration.

Use config ring to check for network interface (NI) ring configuration.

cpu
Use the following cpu command set to enable, disable, and provide the status of the central processing units in a C–brick or server bricks performing the compute function.

cpu

cpu e

cpu d

cpu <exp> e

cpu <exp> d

Use the cpu command to view the status of all cpus. Example 3-11 shows a sample output from the cpu command on a C–brick:

Example 3-11. cpu Command Output

T1-038c01-L1>cpu

CPU Present Enabled
--- ------- -------
0       1       1
1       1       1
2       1       1
3       1       1

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use cpu e to enable all cpus, and use the cpu d command to disable all cpus.

Use cpu <exp> e to enable the number of the cpu entered.

Use cpu <exp> d to disable the number of the cpu entered.

ctc
Use ctc <command> to send a command to a network interface (NI) port (port A). The NI port is found on devices such as a C–brick. Example 3-12 shows sample output from the ctc version command.

Example 3-12. ctc version Command Output

003c01-L1>ctc version 
002c01: 

L1 0.7.37 (Image A), Built 05/24/2000 14:59:42 [P1 support]

cti
Use cti <command> to send a command to an I/O interface (II) port (port A) found in I/O bricks (such as I–brick, P–brick, and so on) cabled to a C–brick. Example 3-13 shows sample output from the cti version command.

Example 3-13. cti version Command Output

003c01-L1>cti version 
002c01: 

L1 0.7.37 (Image A), Built 05/24/2000 14:59:42 [P1 support]

date
Use the following date command set to view and set the current date and time used by the L1 controller.

date

date <str>

date tz

date tz <str>

Use the date command to view the current date and time value used by the L1 controller. Example 3-14 shows sample output.

Example 3-14. date Command Output

001r19-L1>date
09/14/4655  22:47:07

Use date <str> to set the date and time value used by the L1 controller. The variable <str> is a time value in the form yyyymmddHHMMSS (where yyyy is the four-digit year, mm is a two-digit month, dd is a two-digit day, HH is a two-digit hour, MM is a two-digit minute, and SS is a two-digit second).

Use date tz to display the time zone offset used by the L1 controller. Use date tz <str> to set the time zone offset used by the L1 controller. The variable <str> is a maximum of +12 (for 12 hours ahead of GMT) and a minimum of -12 (for 12 hours behind GMT).

debug
The following debug command set provides the status of and sets the virtual debug switches. (In systems that include C–bricks, these commands are valid only for C–bricks.)

debug

debug <switches>

Use the debug command to determine the current settings for the virtual debug switches. Example 3-15 shows sample output.

Example 3-15. debug Command Output

001c07-L1>debug
debug switches set to 0x0000.

Use debug <switches> to set the virtual debug switches. The variable <switches> is a hexadecimal value for the switches. Example 3-16 shows sample output.

Example 3-16. debug <switches> Command Output

001c07-L1>debug 0x0001
debug switches set to 0x0001


display
The following display command set displays text on the front panel display and controls the LEDs on the front panel display.

display

display <exp> <command>

display power on

display attention on

display failure on

display power off

display attention off

display failure off

        Note: For this command, you can use dsp instead of display, pwr instead of power, attn instead of attention, and fail for failure.

Use the display command to view the front panel display status. Example 3-17 shows sample output.

Example 3-17. display Command Output

001c07-L1>display
line 1: 001c10
line 2: powered up

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use display <exp> <command> to write text on the L1 controller display (<exp> value is 1 or 2).

Use display power on to turn on the power LED.

Use display attention on to turn on the attention LED.

Use display failure on to turn on the failure LED.

Use display power off to turn off the power LED.

Use display attention off to turn off the attention LED.

Use display failure off to turn off the failure LED.

eeprom
Use the following eeprom command set to view the eeprom data and to write eeprom data.

eeprom

eeprom <eeprom> <offset> <length>

eeprom NextGen write default

Use the commands in this set as follows:

Use eeprom to view brick eeprom data. Example 3-18 shows sample output.

Use eeprom <eeprom> <offset> <length> to show brick eeprom data for specified eeprom, specified offset, and specified length.

Use eeprom NextGen write default to write standard NextGen EEPROM data to MAC EEPROM.

Example 3-18. eeprom Command Output

001c07-L1>eeprom
PWR/LOG (UNKNOWN)
43 20 01 06 00 00 00 d9 00 02 17 c2 4e 41 c2 4e 
41 c1 00 00 00 00 00 84 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff 
ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff 
00 09 00 3a 52 21 c9 43 45 4c 45 53 54 49 43 41 
c4 49 50 33 35 c6 4b 48 4b 35 36 35 cc 30 33 30 
5f 31 36 30 34 5f 30 30 31 00 c2 5f 46 01 02 c2 
30 30 04 ff ff ff ff 04 ff ff ff ff 04 ff ff ff 
ff c1 00 00 00 00 00 25 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff 
PIMM 0 - no hardware detected
PIMM 1 - no hardware detected
DIMM 0    (SPD)
80 08 07 0c 0a 02 48 00 04 a0 80 02 80 08 08 01 
0e 04 04 01 02 26 00 00 00 00 00 50 3c 50 30 40 
b0 b0 60 60 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 51 
ce 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 4b 4d 4d 33 20 34 36 
4c 33 33 31 33 42 20 54 2d 47 30 20 42 05 00 14 
16 02 09 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff 
ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff 64 ff 
DIMM 2    - no hardware detected
DIMM 4    - no hardware detected
DIMM 6    - no hardware detected
DIMM 1    (SPD)
80 08 07 0c 0a 02 48 00 04 a0 80 02 80 08 08 01 
0e 04 04 01 02 26 00 00 00 00 00 50 3c 50 30 40 
b0 b0 60 60 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 51 
ce 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 4b 4d 4d 33 20 34 36 
4c 33 33 31 33 42 20 54 2d 47 30 20 42 05 00 14 
19 02 09 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff 
ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff 64 ff 
DIMM 3    - no hardware detected
DIMM 5    - no hardware detected
DIMM 7    - no hardware detected


env
The following env command set provides the status of environmental conditions and turns environmental monitoring on and off.

env

env check

env on|off

env temp on|off

env altitude <high|low>

env reset

env test warning

env test fault

env test tmpady

env test tmpcrit

        Note: For this set of commands, you can use rst in place of reset.

Use the commands in this set as follows:

Use env to view the status of the voltage, fan speed, and internal temperature of a brick. The output of the env command is divided into four areas: environmental monitoring and auto start status, voltage status, fan status, and temperature status (see Example 3-19).

Use env check to get a brief environmental status.

Use env on|off to enable or disable environmental monitoring.

Use env temp on|off to turn on or turn off temperature monitoring.

Use env altitude high|low to enable a high altitude (greater than 5000 feet/1524 meters) or low-altitude (less than 5000 feet/1524 meters) temperature limit setting for the environmental monitoring. Example 3-20 shows sample output.

Use env reset to reset all current warnings and faults that are set. Example 3-21 shows sample output.

        Note: For this command, the mnemonic rst may replace the word reset.

Use env test warning to run the environmental warning test.

Use env test fault to run the environmental fault test.

Use env test tmpadv to run the environmental advisory temperature test.

Use env test tmpcrit to run the environmental critical temperature test.

Example 3-19. env Command Output

001c07-L1>env
 
Environmental monitoring is disabled.  Auto start at L1 boot is disabled.
 
Description    State       Warning Limits       Fault Limits         Current
-------------- ----------  -------------------  -------------------  -------
          DIMM    Enabled  10%   2.250/  2.750  20%   2.000/  3.000    2.509
          2.5V    Enabled  10%   2.250/  2.750  20%   2.000/  3.000    2.522
          1.5V    Enabled  10%   1.350/  1.650  20%   1.200/  1.800    1.509
      3.3V aux    Enabled  10%   2.970/  3.630  20%   2.640/  3.960    3.337
       3.3V L1    Enabled  10%   2.970/  3.630  20%   2.640/  3.960    3.302
        5V aux    Enabled  10%   4.500/  5.500  20%   4.000/  6.000    4.992
      12V bias    Enabled  10%  10.800/ 13.200  20%   9.600/ 14.400   12.188
    PIMM0 SRAM    Enabled  10%   2.970/  3.630  20%   2.640/  3.960    3.276
     PIMM0 CPU    Enabled  10%   1.710/  2.090  20%   1.520/  2.280    1.875
    PIMM0 1.5V    Enabled  10%   1.350/  1.650  20%   1.200/  1.800    1.495
PIMM0 3.3V aux    Enabled  10%   2.970/  3.630  20%   2.640/  3.960    3.320
  PIMM0 5V aux    Enabled  10%   4.500/  5.500  20%   4.000/  6.000    4.914
PIMM0 12V bias    Enabled  10%  10.800/ 13.200  20%   9.600/ 14.400   12.125
    PIMM1 SRAM   Disabled  10%   2.970/  3.630  20%   2.640/  3.960   12.125
     PIMM1 CPU   Disabled  10%   1.710/  2.090  20%   1.520/  2.280   12.125
    PIMM1 1.5V   Disabled  10%   1.350/  1.650  20%   1.200/  1.800   12.125
PIMM1 3.3V aux   Disabled  10%   2.970/  3.630  20%   2.640/  3.960   12.125
  PIMM1 5V aux   Disabled  10%   4.500/  5.500  20%   4.000/  6.000   12.125
PIMM1 12V bias   Disabled  10%  10.800/ 13.200  20%   9.600/ 14.400   12.125

Description      State       Warning RPM     Current RPM
-------------   ---------  --------------  -------------
FAN 0             Enabled         2160              2421
FAN 1             Enabled         2160              2421
FAN 2             Enabled         2160              2404
 
                           Advisory  Critical  Fault     Current
Description    State       Temp      Temp      Temp      Temp   
-------------- ----------  --------  --------  --------  ---------
        TEMP 3    Enabled  30C/ 86F  35C/ 95F  40C/104F  26c/ 78F
        TEMP 5   Disabled  30C/ 86F  35C/ 95F  40C/104F   0c/ 32F


The environmental monitoring and auto start status area has two statements. The first statement describes the current state of environmental monitoring. The environmental monitoring state is one of the following:

“disabled - initialization error”

“disabled - configuration error”

“disabled - start error”

“disabled”

“disabled - unknown error (0x00)”

“running”

The second statement describes the current state of the auto start. The auto start state is “enabled” or “disabled.”

The voltage status contains five columns as follows:

The Description column provides the name of the supply voltage (2.5 V, 3.3 V, 5 V, etc.).

The State column provides the current state of the supply voltage (Enabled, Fault, Warning, Waiting, or Disabled).

The Warning Limits column provides the range of voltages that, when exceeded, causes a supply voltage to be in a Warning state.

The Fault Limits column provides the range of voltages that, when exceeded, causes a supply voltage to be in a Fault state.

The Current column provides the current value of the supply voltage.

The fan status contains four columns, as follows:

The Description column provides the name of each fan.

The State column provides the current state of the fan (Warning, Enabled, Waiting, or Disabled).

The Warning RPM column provides the lowest revolutions-per-minute allowed before a fan enters a Warning state.

The Current RPM column provides the current value of the revolutions-per-minute for the fan.

The temperature status contains six columns as follows:

The Description column provides the name of a temperature sensor.

The State column provides the current state of the temperature sensor (Fault, Warning, Enabled, or Disabled).

The Advisory Temp column provides the temperature that, when exceeded, causes a temperature advisory state.

The Critical Temp column provides the temperature that, when exceeded, causes a critical temperature state.

The Fault Temp column provides the temperature that, when exceeded, causes the temperature sensor to be in a Fault state.

The Current Temp column provides the current temperature reading from the temperature sensor.

Example 3-20. env altitude high Command Output

001c07-L1>env altitude high
001c07-L1>


Example 3-21. env reset Command Output

001c07-L1>env reset
001c07-L1>


fan
Use the fan command to determine whether the fans are on or off and to read the fan speeds. In the fan command output, the number in parentheses is the counter reading for the fan. The counter reading is a value provided by the fan tachometer. The system controller converts the counter reading into a revolutions-per-minute value.

Example 3-22 shows sample output from the fan command for an Origin 3000 server or Onyx 3000 graphics system.

Example 3-22. fan Command Output

001c07-L1>fan
fan(s) are on.
fan 0 rpm 2465 (339)
fan 1 rpm 2423 (352)
fan 2 rpm 2430 (349)

When the temperature of the brick is below 30 ˚C, the fans run at 2400 rpm. If a fan fails and the speed of the fan drops below 2100 rpm, the system controller increases the fan speed for the fans to 4400 rpm. If any two fans drop below 2100 rpm, the system controller shuts down the brick.

When the temperature of the brick is between 30 ˚C and 40 ˚C, the fans run at 3400 rpm. If a fan fails and the speed of the fan drops below 3100 rpm, the system controller shuts down the brick.

flash
The following flash command set provides the status of and updates of the firmware images stored in flash memory.

flash status

flash status verbose

flash default <a|b>

flash default current

flash default new

flash default old

flash default reset

Use flash status to view the status of the two firmware images stored in flash memory. Example 3-23 shows sample output. Each image has a checksum value that indicates whether an image is valid.

Example 3-23. flash status Command Output

001c07-L1>flash status
Flash image A currently booted
 
Image   Status     Revision     Built
-----   --------   ----------   -----
  A     default    0.7.27       04/28/2000 13:06:43
  B     valid      0.8.0        05/24/2000 10:50:23

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use flash status verbose to display an expanded version of the flash status.

Use flash default <a|b> to set firmware image A or firmware image B as the default image that the system controller uses when booting. The variable <a|b> is A or B.

Use flash default current to set the current image as the default flash image.

Use flash default new to set the new image as the default flash image.

Use flash default old to set the old image as the default flash image.

Use flash default reset to set the firmware image with the latest time-stamp as the default image that the system controller uses when booting. If the selected firmware image is not valid, the flash default commands will return the following message: “cannot set default--image A (or B) is invalid!”

help
The following help command set provides helpful information on the system controller commands.

help 

help <command> 

Use the help command to generate a list of all of the system controller commands. Use help <command> to display more information on a single command. The variable <command> is the name of a command.

history
Use the history command to display a history of the system maintenance port (SMP) network connection.

In the history command output, the first number in the history length is the number of commands stored in the history array. The second number in the history length is the maximum number of commands that can be stored in the history array. Example 3-24 shows sample output.

        Note: For this command, you can use hist in place of history.

Example 3-24. history Command Output

001c07-L1>history
History length: 3/20
2: fan speed 4
1: fan
0: env


ioport
The following ioport command set displays and sets the speeds and clock source of the I/O ports. This command set is valid only for C-, I-, P-, PE–, X–, and V–bricks.

ioport

ioport 400|600

ioport a 400|600

ioport b 400|600

ioport clksrc a|b

        Note: For the ioport command set, the mnemonic ioprt may replace the word ioport.

Use ioport to view the speed of the I/O ports in the C-, I-, N–, P-, PE–, X-, V–brick, or Origin 300 server and the clock source for the universal system time (UST). The I/O port speed is 400 MHz or 600 MHz. In the command output, the word Junkbus refers to the hub ASIC in the C-brick. The word XBridge refers to the crosstown ASIC in the I-, P-, PE–, X-, or V–brick. Example 3-25 and Example 3-26 show sample output.

Example 3-25. ioport Command Output for a C-Brick

001c07-L1>ioport
Junkbus I/O port speed: 600 MHz - current, attached I/O is detected
                        400 MHz - default, when no attached I/O detected


Example 3-26. ioport Command Output for an X-Brick

001i21-L1>ioport
XBridge port A speed: 400 MHz - current, no attached C detected
XBridge port B speed: 600 MHz - current, from attached C
                      400 MHz - default, when no attached C detected
XBridge UST clock source: port A

Use ioport 400|600 to set the speed of the I/O ports. You can set the I–, P–, PE–, X–, or V–bricks to 400 or 600 (400 MHz or 600 MHz). Example 3-27 shows sample output from the ioport 600 command.

Example 3-27. ioport 600 Command Output

001x004-L1>ioport 600
nvram parameter changed, reset required to affect change.

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use ioport a 400|600 to set the I/O port A to either 400 MHz or 600 MHz.

Use ioport b 400|600 to set the I/O port B to either 400 MHz or 600 MHz.

Use ioport clksrc a|b to set the universal system time (UST) clock source in the I-, P-, PE–, X–, or V–brick to port A or port B. The options are A or B.

Example 3-28 shows sample output from the ioport clksrc a command. These commands are valid only for the I-, P-, PE–, X–, and V–bricks.

Example 3-28. ioport clksrc a Command Output

001x004-L1>ioport clksrc a
nvram parameter changed, reset required to affect change.


istat
Use the following istat command set to view the status of the memory, queues, tasks, and memory allocation.

istat memory

istat queues

istat tasks

istat pmalloc

Use istat memory to view the status of the L1 controller memory. Example 3-29 shows sample output.

Example 3-29. istat memory Command Output

001c07-L1>istat memory
SYSMEM   [0x30005cf8]    Size: 41656                     Avail:  26792
SMLPOOL  [0x30005cbc]    Size: 8704/ 272 Avail:     28
BIGPOOL  [0x30005c80]    Size: 16640/1040 Avail:     15

Use istat queues to view the status of the L1 controller queues. Example 3-30 shows sample output.

Example 3-30. istat queues Command Output

001c07-L1>istat queues
CMD_REQQ [0x30008a54]    Size: 10   Avail: 10   Msgs:  0
CMD_RSPQ [0x30008a9c]    Size: 10   Avail: 10   Msgs:  0
SMP_RQUE [0x3000c8a0]    Size: 10   Avail: 10   Msgs:  0
SMP_WQUE [0x3000c8e8]    Size: 10   Avail: 10   Msgs:  0
SMP_IQUE [0x3000c930]    Size: 10   Avail: 10   Msgs:  0
CTI_WQUE [0x3000f38c]    Size: 10   Avail: 10   Msgs:  0
USB_WQUE [0x3000ee7c]    Size: 10   Avail: 10   Msgs:  0
SCAN_QUE [0x30002440]    Size: 20   Avail: 20   Msgs:  0
FLASH_Q  [0x30009c64]    Size:  5   Avail:  5   Msgs:  0
BDR_WQUE [0x3000a0c8]    Size: 10   Avail: 10   Msgs:  0

Use istat tasks to view the status of the L1 controller tasks. Example 3-31 shows sample output.

Example 3-31. istat tasks Command Output

001c07-L1>istat tasks
MAIN_TSK [0x300019f8] (SLEEP     )  STACK: 2048 @ 0x300011f8 ( 904 used, 1144 free)
USB_CNTL [0x30007f38] (DRV_SUSP  )  STACK: 1536 @ 0x30007fe0 ( 288 used, 1248 free)
CMD_ITSK [0x300096e4] (READY     )  STACK: 3072 @ 0x30008ae4 (1936 used, 1136 free)
SMP_RTSK [0x3000e1c8] (EVT_SUSP  )  STACK: 2048 @ 0x3000c9c8 ( 800 used, 1248 free)
SMP_ITSK [0x3000e318] (QUEUE_SUSP)  STACK: 2048 @ 0x3000d9c8 ( 768 used, 1280 free)
SMP_WTSK [0x3000e270] (QUEUE_SUSP)  STACK: 2048 @ 0x3000d1c8 ( 416 used, 1632 free)
ENV_PITK [0x3000a9ec] (SEM_SUSP  )  STACK: 1024 @ 0x3000addc ( 276 used,  748 free)
ENV_FITK [0x3000aa94] (SEM_SUSP  )  STACK: 1024 @ 0x3000b1dc ( 260 used,  764 free)
ENV_TITK [0x3000ab3c] (SEM_SUSP  )  STACK: 1024 @ 0x3000b5dc ( 264 used,  760 free)
ENV_PMTK [0x3000abe4] (SEM_SUSP  )  STACK: 1024 @ 0x3000b9dc ( 260 used,  764 free)
ENV_FMTK [0x3000ac8c] (SEM_SUSP  )  STACK: 1024 @ 0x3000bddc ( 268 used,  756 free)
ENV_TMTK [0x3000ad34] (SEM_SUSP  )  STACK: 1024 @ 0x3000c1dc ( 324 used,  700 free)
BDR_RTSK [0x30009f30] (DRV_SUSP  )  STACK: 2048 @ 0x30016524 (1204 used,  844 free)
BDR_WTSK [0x3000a020] (QUEUE_SUSP)  STACK: 1024 @ 0x30016d34 ( 532 used,  492 free)
CTI_RTSK [0x3000f23c] (DRV_SUSP  )  STACK: 2048 @ 0x3001717c ( 892 used, 1156 free)
CTI_WTSK [0x3000f2e4] (QUEUE_SUSP)  STACK: 2048 @ 0x3001798c ( 572 used, 1476 free)
USB_RTSK [0x3000edd4] (READY     )  STACK: 1800 @ 0x300181d4 ( 732 used, 1068 free)
USB_WTSK [0x3000eeec] (QUEUE_SUSP)  STACK: 1500 @ 0x300188ec ( 480 used, 1020 free)
SCAN_TSK [0x30002398] (QUEUE_SUSP)  STACK: 2048 @ 0x30001b98 ( 600 used, 1448 free)
I2C_HIGH [0x30007154] (SEM_SUSP  )  STACK: 1500 @ 0x300071fc ( 248 used, 1252 free)
I2C_LOW  [0x30006a2c] (SEM_SUSP  )  STACK: 1500 @ 0x30006ad4 ( 396 used, 1104 free)
FLASH_T  [0x30009bbc] (QUEUE_SUSP)  STACK: 1024 @ 0x300097bc ( 316 used,  708 free)

Use istat pmalloc to view the status of the memory allocation. Example 3-32 shows sample output.

Example 3-32. istat pmalloc Command Output

001c07-L1>istat pmalloc
 
small pool size:   272
small pool avail:   28
small pool used:     3
small pool max:     25
 
big pool size:    1040
big pool avail:     15
big pool used:       0
big pool max:        3 
pmalloc calls:       0
prealloc calls:      3
 
history:


junkbus
The following junkbus command set provides the status of and sets the L1 controller-to-junkbus protocol setting. (For systems that include a C–brick, these commands are valid only for the C–brick.)

junkbus

junkbus dump output

junkbus dump input

junkbus capture reset

        Note: For the junkbus command set, you can use jbus instead of junkbus, d instead of dump, o for output, i for input, and rst for reset.

Use junkbus to determine the current settings for the L1-controller-to-junkbus protocol. Example 3-33 shows sample output for this command. PPP refers to point-to-point protocol. (Use the l1dbg command set to turn debugging on or off.)

Example 3-33. junkbus Command Output

001c003-L1>junkbus
junkbus protocol is PPP

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use junkbus dump output to dump the L1 controller-to-junkbus output capture.

Use junkbus dump input to dump the L1 controller–to–junkbus input capture.

Use junkbus capture reset to reset the L1 controller–to–junkbus input or output capture.

l1
Use the l1 command to engage the L1 controller command processor. Press Ctrl+D to disengage the command processor. Example 3-34 shows sample output.

Example 3-34. l1 Command Output

001c003-L1>l1
L1 command processor engaged, <CTRL-D> to exit.


l1dbg
The following l1dbg command set displays and sets the state of communication debugging features.

l1dbg

l1dbg junkbus <on|off>

l1dbg irtr <on|off>

l1dbg env <exp> (1=pwr, 2=fan, 4=tmp, 8=setup)

l1dbg env off

l1dbg port <on|off>

l1dbg i2c <on|off>

l1dbg margin <on|off>

l1dbg pppdump <on|off>

l1dbg promreq <on|off>

l1dbg qsusp <exp> <exp>

Use l1dbg to display the state of the communication debugging features. Example 3-35 shows sample output.

Example 3-35. l1dbg Command Output

001c07-L1>l1dbg
L1 irouter debugging is off
L1 junkbus communication debugging is off
L1 environmental debugging is off
L1 port interrupt debugging is off
L1 i2c interrupt debugging is off
L1 voltage margin debugging is off

Use l1dbg junkbus <on|off> to turn on communication debugging for the L1 controller-to-junkbus-ASIC communication. The variable <on|off> is on or off. Example 3-36 shows sample output from the l1dbg junkbus on command.

Example 3-36. l1dbg junkbus on Command Output

001c07-L1>l1dbg junkbus on
L1 irouter debugging is off
L1 junkbus communication debugging is on
L1 environmental debugging is off
L1 port interrupt debugging is off
L1 i2c interrupt debugging is off
L1 voltage margin debugging is off

The other l1dbg commands in this set function in the same manner as the l1dbg junkbus <on|off> command. Table 3-5 lists the debugging features that each command controls.

Table 3-5. l1dbg Commands

Command

Description

l1dbg junkbus < on|off>

Controls junkbus ASIC debugging.

l1dbg irtr < on|off>

Controls irouter debugging.

l1dbg env <exp>

Turns on environmental debugging. Options for <exp> are 1=power, 2=fan, 4=temperature, 8=setup.

l1dbg env off

Turns off environmental debugging.

l1dbg port < on|off>

Controls L1-port interrupt debugging.

l1dgb i2c < on|off>

Controls I2C interrupt debugging.

l1dbg margin < on|off>

Controls voltage margin debugging.

l1dbg pppdump < on|off>

Controls data dump on junkbus ppp errors.

l1dbg promreq <on|off>

Controls PROM request debugging.

l1dbg qsusp <exp> <exp>

Sets queue suspend time req/rsp and evt.


leds
Use the leds command to read the value of the group 0 and group 1 status LEDs. In systems that include a C–brick, this command is only valid for the C–brick. These LEDs connect to I/O expanders that monitor group 0 status LEDs 0 through 15 and group 1 status LEDs 0 through 15. In the output of the leds command, the CPUs correspond to the status LEDs as follows:

CPU A corresponds to I/O expander A_0100001x - group 0 status LEDs 0 through 7.

CPU B corresponds to I/O expander A_0100010x - group 0 status LEDs 8 through 15.

CPU C corresponds to I/O expander A_0100011x - group 1 status LEDs 0 through 7.

CPU D corresponds to I/O expander A_0100100x - group 1 status LEDs 8 through 15.

The number next to the CPU letter is a hexadecimal value that represents the value of the status LEDs that connect to the I/O expander (a bit set to 1 indicates the LED is on, a bit set to 0 indicates the LED is off). Example 3-37 shows sample output from the leds command. Table 3-6 shows the meanings of the hexadecimal values for the status LEDs.

Example 3-37. leds Command Output

001c07-L1>leds
CPU A: 0x02
CPU B: 0x02
CPU C: 0x0f
CPU D: 0x0f

Table 3-6. LED Message Explanations

Message on LED

Meaning

0x00

PLED_RESET. Slave loop (0x00/0x45=okay, solid 0x00=possibly hung.

0x01

PLED_INITCPU. Init the processor, FP, and C0P0 registers

0x02

PLED_TESTCP1. Test processor C0P1 registers.

0x03

PLED_RUNTLB. Switch to mapped mode.

0x04

PLED_TESTICACHE. Test processor instruction cache.

0x05

PLED_TESTDCACHE. Test processor primary data cache.

0x06

PLED_TESTSCACHE. Test secondary cache.

0x07

PLED_FLUSHCACHES. Flush all caches.

0x08

PLED_CHUBLOCAL. }

0x09

PLED_CKHUBCONFIG. }

0x0A

PLED_INVICACHE. Invalidate processor primary I–cache.



link
Use the link command to show the error status for the network interface (NI) and I/O interface (II) connector links.

Use the link verbose command to show the complete status for the NI and II connector links.

        Note: For this command, you can use v in the place of verbose.

log
The following log command set displays the contents of the log, clears or resets the log, and writes an entry into the log.

log

log clear|reset

log insert <entry> 

Use log to view the contents of the log. Example 3-38 shows sample output. If the log is empty, the output from the log command is “log is empty.”

Example 3-38. log Command Output

001c07-L1>log
USB: registered as remote
USB-R: USB:device was reset
USB: unregistered
USB-R: IRouter:read failed - read error
USB: registered as remote
USB-R: USB:device was reset
USB: unregistered
USB-R: IRouter:read failed - read error
USB: registered as remote
SMP-R: UART:UART_NO_CONNECTION
L1 booting...
[L1-0] ALERT: eeprom.c line 367 ; eeprom 0 checksum error.
USB: registered as remote
L1 booting...
[L1-0] ALERT: eeprom.c line 367 ; eeprom 0 checksum error.
USB: registered as remote
CTI-R: UART:UART_BREAK_RECEIVED
CTI-R: IRouter:read failed - read error
USB-R: USB:device was reset

Use log clear or log reset to empty the log. Example 3-39 shows sample output.

Example 3-39. log reset Command Output

001c003-L1>log reset
log reset.

Use log insert <entry> to write a line in the log. The variable <entry> is text to enter into the log. Example 3-40 shows sample output from the log Start the Test command.

Example 3-40. log insert Start the Test Command Output

001c003-L1>log insert Start the Test
log entry made.


network
The following network command set displays and sets the mode of the network communication interface. (For systems that include a C–brick, this command is valid only for C–bricks.)

network

network usb

network 422 

network autodetect|auto on

network autodetect|auto off

Use network to view the current mode of the network communication interface. Example 3-41 shows sample output.

Example 3-41. network Command Output

001c07-L1>network
network interface communication is USB

Use network usb to set the network communication interface mode to Universal Serial Bus (USB) and disable autodetection. Use network 422 to set the network communication interface mode to RS-422 protocol and disable autodetection. Example 3-42 shows sample output from the network usb command.

Example 3-42. network usb Command Output

001c003-L1>network usb
nvram parameter changed, reset required to affect change.

Use network autodetect|auto on to turn on the autodetection. Use network autodetect|auto off to turn off the autodetection.

nmi
Use the nmi command to issue a non-maskable interrupt (NMI). For systems that include a C–brick, the nmi command is valid only for the C-brick.

After the L1 system controller receives an nmi command, it displays “NMI...” on the front panel display and asserts the NMI signal in I/O expander B_0100001x. If no errors occur while the system controller issues the NMI, it displays “NMI done” on the front panel display (see Example 3-43 and Figure 3-1). If an error occurs, the system controller displays “NMI Fail” on the front panel display.

Example 3-43. nmi Command Output

001c07-L1>nmi
001c07-L1>


Figure 3-1. Example of nmi Front Panel Display Output



nvram reset
The nvram reset command returns the NVRAM settings of the L1 controller to the factory default settings.

partdb
The following partdb command set displays, enables, and disables partitioning.

partdb

partdb enable

partdb disable

        Note: For this command set, you can use e or on instead of enable and d or off instead of disable.

Use partdb to display partition information from the database. Use partdb enable to enable the partition for a system, and use partdb disable to disable the partition for a system.

pbay
The following pbay command set displays information about the power bay, distributed power supplies (DPSs), DC output ports, and FRUs:

pbay

pbay version

pbay dps

pbay dps <dps number 1 - 6>

pbay dcport

pbay dcport <DC port number 1 - 8>

pbay fru

pbay fru <0 for power bay, 1 - 6 for DPS>

pbay reset

pbay env

pbay env on|off

pbay init

pbay serial

Use the pbay command to view the status of the power bay (see Example 3-44).

Example 3-44. pbay Command Output

001r28-L1>pbay
Total current: 16.5 Amps (+/-11%)

Use pbay version to view the firmware version of the power bay (see Example 3-45).

Example 3-45. pbay version Command Output

001r28-L1>pbay version
PBay FW Version 00.18, Built 09/29/2001 14:00:00

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use pbay dps to view the status of all distributed power supplies (DPS).

Use pbay dps <powerbay number> to view the status of an individual distributed power supply. The distributed power supplies are identified by a number ranging from 1 to 6.

Use pbay dcport to view the status of all DC output ports.

Use pbay dcport <port number> to view the status for an individual DC port. The ports are identified by a number ranging from 1 to 8.

Use pbay fru to view information about all the power bays and DPS FRUs.

Use pbay fru <powerbay number) to view information about the individual power bay FRUs, use the number 0. To view information about a distributed power supply FRU, use the numbers 1 through 6.

Use pbay reset to reset the power bay and the power supplies.

Use pbay env to view the status of environmental monitoring.

Use pbay env on|off to enable or disable environmental monitoring.

Use pbay init to initialize communication with the power bay.

Use pbay serial to display the power bay ICMB card serial number.

pci
The following pci command set displays the status of the PCI cards in an I/O brick, an Origin 300 server, or a PCI expansion module, and powers up, powers down, and resets a PCI card.

pci

pci <u|d>

pci <bus> u|d

pci <bus> <slot> u|d

pci reset

pci <bus> reset

pci <bus> <slot> reset

        Note: For this command set, the mnemonic rst may replace the word reset.

Use the pci command to view the value of the status register for each PCI card. The output of the pci command contains eight columns, as follows:

The Bus column lists the number of the bus for each PCI card.

The Slot column lists the slot value for each PCI card.

The Stat column lists the hexadecimal value of the status register for each PCI card.

The Card Type column lists the card type (7.5 W, 15 W, 25 W, or none) for each slot.

The Power column lists the value (error & off, error & on, okay & off, or okay & on) of the power OK and power on bits.

The Attn LED column lists the value (off or on) of the attention LED for the PCI card.

The Enable column lists the value (off or on) of the bus enable bit for the PCI card.

The Reset column lists the value (off or on) of the reset bit for the PCI card.

Example 3-46 shows sample output from the pci command.

Example 3-46. pci Command Output

001i21-L1>pci
Bus Slot Stat Card Type Power       Attn LED Enable Reset
--- ---- ---- --------- ----------- -------- ------ -----
  1    1 0x91       15W  okay &  on      off     on   off
  1    2 0x57      none  okay & off      off    off    on
  1    3 0x91       15W  okay &  on      off     on   off
  1    4 0xff  on board   N/A & N/A      N/A    N/A   off
  2    1 0x57      none  okay & off      off    off    on
  2    2 0x57      none  okay & off      off    off    on

Use pci <u|d> to power up (u) or power down (d) all of the PCI cards in an I/O brick, Origin 300 server, or PCI expansion module. Example 3-47 shows sample output.

Example 3-47. pci d Command Output

001i21-L1>pci d
001i21-L1>

Use pci <bus> <u|d> to power up (u) or power down (d) all of the PCI cards on a bus in an I/O brick, Origin 300 server, or PCI expansion module. The variable <bus> is the bus number. Example 3-48 shows sample output from the pci 1 u command.

Example 3-48. pci 1 u Command Output

001i21-L1>pci 1 u
001i21-L1>

Use pci <bus> <slot> <u|d> to power up (u) or power down (d) an individual PCI card. The variable <bus> is the bus number and the variable <slot> is the slot number. Example 3-49 shows sample output from the pci 1 2 u command.

Example 3-49. pci 1 2 u Command Output

001i21-L1>pci 1 2 u
001i21-L1>

Use pci reset to reset all of the PCI cards in an I/O brick, Origin 300 server, or PCI expansion module. Example 3-50 shows sample output.

Example 3-50. pci reset Command Output

001i21-L1>pci reset
001i21-L1>

Use pci <bus> reset to reset all of the PCI cards on a bus in an I/O brick, Origin 300 server, or PCI expansion module. The variable <bus> is the bus number. Example 3-51 shows sample output from the pci 1 reset command.

Example 3-51. pci 1 reset Command Output

001i21-L1>pci 1 reset
001i21-L1>

Use pci <bus> <slot> reset to reset an individual PCI card. The variable <bus> is the bus number and the variable <slot> is the slot number. Example 3-52 shows sample output from the pci 1 2 reset command.

Example 3-52. pci 1 2 reset Command Output

001i21-L1>pci 1 2 reset
001i21-L1>


pimm
The following pimm command set displays the state of and sets the processor inline memory module (PIMM) clock source and clock mode. (This command set is valid only for C–bricks.)

pimm

pimm clksrc <external|internal>

pimm clkmode <async|sync>

        Note: For the pimm command set, you can use the mnemonics int and ext instead of the words internal and external.

Use pimm to determine the PIMM clock source (internal or external) and the clock mode (synchronous or asynchronous). Example 3-53 shows sample output.

Example 3-53. pimm Command Output

001c07-L1>pimm
PIMM clock source is external
PIMM mode is asynchronous

Use pimm clksrc <external|internal> to set the PIMM clock source to external or internal. Example 3-54 shows sample output.

Example 3-54. pimm clksrc internal Command Output

001c07-L1>pimm clksrc internal
nvram parameter changed, reset required to affect change.

Use pimm clkmode <async|sync> to set the PIMM clock mode to asynchronous (async) or synchronous (sync). Example 3-55 shows sample output.

Example 3-55. pimm clkmode sync Command Output

001c07-L1>pimm clkmode sync
nvram parameter changed, reset required to affect change.


port
Use the port command to view the value of the status register for each port on a brick. As shown in Example 3-56 and Example 3-57, the output of the port command contains six columns, as follows:

The Port column lists the name of each port.

The Stat column lists the hexadecimal value of the status register for each port.

The Remote Pwr column lists the value, “okay” or “none,” of the remote power OK bit (bit 0) for each port.

The Local Pwr column lists the value, “okay” or “none,” of the local power OK bit (bit 1) for each port.

The Link LED column lists the value, “on” or “off,” of the link LED bit (bit 2) for each port.

The SW LED column lists the value, “on” or “off,” of the software LED bit (bit 3) for each port.

        Note: For this command, the mnemonic prt may replace the word port.

Example 3-56. port Command Output for an R–brick

001r19-L1>port
Port Stat Remote Pwr Local Pwr  Link LED SW LED
---- ---- ---------- ---------- -------- --------
   A 0x02       none       okay      off      off
   B 0x0f       okay       okay       on       on
   C 0x0f       okay       okay       on       on
   D 0x02       none       okay      off      off
   E 0x02       none       okay      off      off
   F 0x0b       okay       okay      off       on
   G 0x0b       okay       okay      off       on
   H 0x02       none       okay      off      off


Example 3-57. port Command Output for a C–brick

001c07-L1>port
Port Stat Remote Pwr Local Pwr  Link LED SW LED
---- ---- ---------- ---------- -------- --------
   A 0x0f       okay       okay       on       on
   B 0x0f       okay       okay       on       on


power
The following power command set displays the status of the supplies, and powers up and powers down the supplies.

power

power check

power vrm

power <up|down>

power up hold

        Note: For the power command set, the mnemonics pwr, u, and d may replace the words power, up, and down.

Use power to view the detailed current state of the power and margin values for the power supplies in a brick or system. Example 3-58 shows sample output.

Example 3-58. power Command Output

001c07-L1>power
Supply          State Voltage    Margin  Value
--------------  ----- ---------  ------- -----
           48V     on       N/A      N/A
          DIMM     on    2.509V  default   132
          2.5V     on    2.522V  default   120
          1.5V     on    1.509V  default   110
      3.3V aux     NC    3.337V      N/A
       3.3V L1     NC    3.302V      N/A
        5V aux     NC    4.992V      N/A
      12V bias     NC   12.188V      N/A
    PIMM0 SRAM     on    3.276V  default   125
     PIMM0 CPU     on    1.875V  default   142
    PIMM0 1.5V     NC    1.495V  default     3
PIMM0 3.3V aux     NC    3.320V      N/A
  PIMM0 5V aux     NC    4.914V      N/A
PIMM0 12V bias     NC   12.125V      N/A
    PIMM1 SRAM     <not present>
     PIMM1 CPU     <not present>
    PIMM1 1.5V     <not present>
PIMM1 3.3V aux     <not present>
  PIMM1 5V aux     <not present>
PIMM1 12V bias     <not present>

Use power check to view the summary of the current state of the power and margin values for the power supplies in a brick or system. Example 3-59 shows sample output.

Example 3-59. power check Command Output

001c07-L1>power check
power appears on

Use power <up|down> to power up or power down all of the power supplies in a brick or system. Example 3-60 shows sample output.

Example 3-60. power up Command Output

001c07-L1>power up
001c07-L1>


reboot_l1
The following reboot_l1 command set reboots the L1 controller.

reboot_l1 

reboot_l1 <a|b>

reboot_l1 <current|old|new|other>

reboot_l1 addr <exp>

reboot_l1 raw <exp>

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use reboot_l1 to reboot the L1 controller using the newest firmware image (firmware image A or firmware image B).

Use reboot_l1 <a|b> to reboot the L1 controller using the specified firmware image (A or B).

Use reboot_l1 <current|old|new|other> to reboot the L1 controller using either the current, older, newer, or other (non-current) flash image.

Use reboot_l1 addr <exp> to validate and boot the L1 controller flash image at the flash image address listed for <exp>.

Use reboot_l1 raw <exp> to boot the L1 controller flash image at the flash image address listed for <exp>.

reset
Use the reset command to perform a reset of the system. After the system controller receives a reset command, it sets various control and status signals back to their default values, and reboots the operating system. Example 3-61 shows sample output.

Example 3-61. ??? Command Output???

001c07-L1>reset
001c07-L1>


router
Use the following router command set to view and set router types, to set routers in different modes for reasons such as service, and to enable router ports. This command set is valid only for R–bricks and NUMAlink modules:

router

router meta

router repeater

router ordinary

router 6 port

router 8 port

router 8 port <str> <str> <str> <str>

router service <str> <str> <str> <str>

router service off

router spare

        Note: For the router command set, you can use rtr instead of router, rep instead of repeater, and ord instead of ordinary.

Use router to view the current router type. Example 3-62 shows sample output.

Example 3-62. router Command Output

001r19-L1>router
router type is ordinary

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use router meta to set the router type to meta.

Use router repeater to set the router type to repeater.

Use router ordinary to set the router type to ordinary.

Use router 6 port to enable all 6–port router ports.

Use router 8 port to enable all 8–port router ports.

Use router 8 port <str> <str> <str> <str> to enable all the 8-port router ports of the router specified with the IP address listed for the <str> <str> <str> <str> variable.

Use router service <str> <str> <str> <str> to set into service mode, for repair, the 8-port router specified with the IP address listed for the <str> <str> <str> <str> variable.

Use router service off to disable the service mode after the repairs are completed.

Use router spare to configure the router for spare tear down.

security verify
Use the security verify <3400|3800> command to test the security readiness of SGI Origin 3400 and SGI Origin 3800 servers. Use security verify 3400 to verify the security readiness of the Origin 3400 servers. Use security verify 3800 to test the security readiness of Origin 3800 servers.

select
The following select command set displays and sets the device to serve as console I/O. (These commands are valid only for C–bricks, or other devices with CPUs.)

select

select <rack> <slot>

select subchannel console

select subchannel <exp>

select subchannel <a|b|c|d>

select subchannel <str>

select filter <on|off>

        Note: For this command set, you can use sel in the place of select, sub or s in the place of subchannel, and con in the place of console.

Use the select command to view the current mode of console I/O. Example 3-63 shows sample output.

Example 3-63. select Command Output

001c07-L1>select
console input:  001c07 console
console output: not filtered.

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use select <rack> <slot> to set the rack and slot location of the device to be console I/O.

Use select subchannel console to set the current console subchannel as console I/O.

Use select subchannel <exp> to set the mode of console I/O to the subchannel specified for <exp> (possible values for <exp> are 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4).

Use select subchannel <a|b|c|d> to set the mode of console I/O to a CPU subchannel (possible CPU subchannel values are a, b, c or d).

Use select subchannel <str> to set the mode of console I/O to a specified CPU subchannel (0, 1, 2, 3, or 4).

Use select filter <on|off> to enable (on) or disable (off) the console output filter.

serial
Use the following serial command set to view and set the system serial number (SSN) that is stored in each brick.

serial

serial verify

serial all

serial dimm

serial clear

serial <str> <str> <str> <str>

serial security on

Use the commands in this set as follows:

Use serial to view the secure system serial number (SSN) settings stored in the NVRAM.

Use serial verify to test the brick's readiness for secure serial numbering.

Use serial all to show the brick serial number (BSN) and the SSN settings in NVRAM.

Use serial dimm to show the dual-inline memory module (DIMM) part and serial number.

Use serial clear to clear the SSN.

Use serial <str> <str> <str> <str> to erase and reassign the device's SSN. The variable <str> <str> <str> <str> is the value of a security key that is provided only to SGI employees.

Use serial security on to enable the SSN security.

softreset
Use the softreset command to issue a software reset. In systems that include a C–brick, the softreset command is valid only for the C-brick.

After receiving a softreset command, the system controller displays “Sft rst...” on the front panel display and asserts the soft reset signal in I/O expander B_0100001x. If no errors occur while the system controller issues the soft reset, it displays “Sft rst done” on the front panel display (see Example 3-64 and Figure 3-2). If an error occurs while the system controller issues the soft reset, it displays “Sft rst fail” on the front panel display.

        Note: For this command, you can use the mnemonic softrst instead of the word softreset.

Example 3-64. softreset Command Output

001c07-L1>softreset
001c07-L1>


Figure 3-2. Example of softreset Command Output



test
Use the following test command set to test various components in the L1 controller.

test i2c

test i2c <passes>

test ioexp set <index> <value>

test ioexp get <index>

test ioexp get all

test intr

test display

test exception <mem|stack|wdog|fatal>

        Note: For this command set, you can use the mnemonic tst and exc in place of the words test and exception.

Use the commands in this set as follows:

Use test i2c to test the I2C bus once.

Use test i2c <passes> to test the I2C bus as many passes as you enter for the <passes> variable.

Use test ioexp set <index> <value> to set a value for an I/O expander. The variable <index> is an I2C bus address and the variable <value> is the value for the I/O expander.

Use test ioexp get <index> to read a value from an I/O expander. The variable <index> is an I2C bus address.

Use test ioexp get all to read the values from all of the I/O expanders.

Use test intr to view the I2C bus interrupt counts. Example 3-65 shows sample output.

Use test display to reset the L1 controller liquid crystal display (LCD).

Use test exception <mem|stack|wdog|fatal> to test the memory fault handling, stack corruption error handling, software watchdog reset, or fatal_error() call.

Example 3-65. test intr Command Output

001r19-L1>test intr
I2C interrupts, High: 25  Low: 406
DS1780  0, 1:    0 (0x00) 2:    0 (0x00)
IOExp  0:  197
IOExp  1:    0
IOExp  2:    0
IOExp  3:    0
IOExp  4:  137
IOExp  5:    0
IOExp  6:   11
IOExp  7:    0


uart
The following uart command set displays the status of the following UARTs (universal asynchronous receivers/transmitters): CTI, CTC, SMP, and Junkbus. This command also enables you to reset the UART of the Junkbus ASIC.

uart 

uart junkbus reset (You can use r in place of reset for this command)

Example 3-66 shows sample output from the uart command.

Example 3-66. uart Command Output

001c20-L1>uart
      Baud    Read    Read    Read     Read   Read   Write   Write   Write
UART  Rate    State   Status  Timeouts Breaks Errors State   Status  Timeouts
----  ----    -----   ------  -------- ------ ------ -----   ------  --------
CTI   107142  Discon  Ready   0        0      0      Discon  Ready   0    
CTC   107142  Discon  Ready   0        0      0      Discon  Ready   0    
SMP   37500   Discon  Ready   0        0      1      Discon  Ready   0    
BED   57692   Connect Suspend 0        0      13     Connect Ready   0 


usb
The usb command displays status information for the USB (universal serial bus) L1 port. SSEs use this port to access L1 controllers in systems that do not have L2 controllers. Example 3-67 shows sample output.

Example 3-67. usb Command Output

001c20-L1>usb
Device: 0  Disconnects: 2  Bus Resets:  13
Endpoint State    Status    Stalls Errors Timeouts
-------- -----    ------    ------ ------ --------
Control  Active   Suspended 43     0      0    
Read     Active   Ready     0      0      0    
Write    Active   Ready     0      0      0


verbose
Use the verbose command to get a system maintenance port (SMP) prompt and get into character–echo mode.

version
Use the version command to view the version of the firmware that is currently running in the system controller. Example 3-68 shows sample output.

Example 3-68. version Command Output

001r19-L1>version
L1 0.7.27 (Image A), Built 04/28/2002 13:06:43    [P1 support]


L2 Controller Commands
The following subsections describe the L2 controller commands and command sets, which are listed alphabetically. Examples of output are included where applicable.

autopower
The following autopower command set enables, disables, aborts, and shows the current auto power status.

autopower

autopower on

autopower off

autopower abort

        Note: For these commands, the mnemonic apwr may replace the word autopower.

Use the autopower command to view the current auto power up setting. Example 3-69 shows the sample output.

Example 3-69. autopower Command Output

L2>autopower
auto power up appears disabled
L2>

Use autopower on to enable the auto power on. Use autopower off to disable the auto power on. Use autopower abort to abort the auto power on.

config
The following config command set displays configuration information.

config

config summary

config verbose

config l2

config l2 verbose

config rescan

config auto

config manual

config print

config print all

        Note: For these commands, the mnemonic cfg may replace the word config, and s, v, and re may replace the words summary, verbose, and rescan.

Use the config command to view configuration information for all the L1 controllers connected to all the L2 controllers in the server system (see Example 3-70). In the config command output, the first number is the IP address of the L2 controller (127.0.0.1 in the output below). The number that follows the IP address, after the first colon, is the USB port number (1 in the output below).

Example 3-70. config Command output

L2> config
127.0.0.1:
127.0.0.1:0:0 - 001r19
127.0.0.1:1:0 - 001c07
127.0.0.1:1:1 - 001i21
127.0.0.1:2:0 - 001c10

The number that follows the USB port number, after the second colon, is the L1 index. Table 3-7 lists the values of the L1 index.

Table 3-7. L1 Index Values

L1 Index

Name

Description

0

Local brick

The C-brick that connects to the L2 through the USB cable.

1

Attached I/O brick

An I/O brick that connects to the local brick.

2 or 3

Attached C-brick

A C-brick that connects to the local brick.

3 or 4

I/O brick attached to the attached C-brick

An I/O brick that connects to a C–brick that connects to the local brick.

The number that follows the L1 index, after the dash, is the brick identification number (for example, 001c07). The first three digits of the brick identification number indicate the rack in which the brick resides. The fourth digit indicates the type of brick (see Table 3-8). The last two digits indicate the slot position in which the brick resides.

Table 3-8. Valid Brick Types

Type

Description

c

C–brick

i

I–brick

p

P–brick

r

R–brick

x

X–brick

?

Unknown brick type

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use config summary to see summary configuration information.

Use config verbose to see more detailed configuration information for all the L1 controllers connected to all the server's L2 controllers.

Use config l2 to see configuration information for all the L1 controllers connected to the local L2 controller.

Use config l2 verbose to see more detailed L2 controller configuration information.

Use config rescan to force an L1 controller configuration update.

Use config auto to enable automatic L1 controller configuration updates.

Use config manual to disable automatic L1 controller configuration updates.

Use config print to print out the local configuration for debugging purposes.

Use config print all to print out a full configuration for debugging purposes.

date
Use the following date command set to view and set the current date and time used by the L2 controller.

date

date <str>

date tz

date tz <str>

Use the date command to view the current date and time value used by the L2 controller. Example 3-71 shows sample output.

Example 3-71. date Command Output

L2>date
09/14/4655  22:47:07

Use date <str> to set the date and time value used by the L2 controller. The variable <str> is a time value in the form yyyymmddHHMMSS (where yyyy is the four-digit year, mm is a two-digit month, dd is a two-digit day, HH is a two-digit hour, MM is a two-digit minute, and SS is a two-digit second).

Use date tz to display the time zone offset used by the L2 controller. Use date tz <str> to set the time zone offset used by the L2 controller. The variable <str> is a maximum of +12 (for 12 hours ahead of GMT) and a minimum of -12 (for 12 hours behind GMT).

destination
The following destination command set displays the brick identification numbers of bricks that are the destinations of L2 commands, and sets the bricks that are the destinations for L2 commands.

destination

rack <rng> slot <rng> destination

destination reset

        Note: For these commands, the mnemonic dest may replace the word destination. Also, the mnemonics r and s may replace the words rack and slot.

Use the destination command to view the brick identification numbers of the bricks that are the destinations of L2 commands. Example 3-72 shows sample output.

Example 3-72. destination Command Output

L2> destination 
all racks, all slots 

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> destination to set individual bricks that are the destinations for L2 commands. The variable <rng> specifies a rack number(s) and slot number(s).

        Note: For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, or two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.

Example 3-73. rack <rng> slot <rng> destination Command Output

L2> r 1 s 7 destination 
1 default destination(s) set
L2> destination
001c07 (127.0.0.1:1:0)

Use destination reset to reset the destination of L2 commands to all bricks in all racks and all slots. Example 3-74 shows sample output.

        Note: For this command, the mnemonic rst may replace the word reset.

Example 3-74. destination reset Command Output

L2> destination reset 
default destination reset to all bricks and slots 


dhcpserver
The following dhcpserver command set displays the setting for the current DHCP server (see Example 3-75) and enables and disables the DHCP server.

dhcpserver

dhcpserver on|enable

dhcpserver off|disable

        Note: For this command, the mnemonic dhcps may replace the word dhcpserver.

Example 3-75. dhcpserver Command Output

L2>dhcpserver
DHCP server startup enabled (if no other DHCP server is found).


env
The following env command set provides an environmental status summary.

env summary

rack <rng> slot <rng> env summary

        Note: For this command, r may replace the word rack; s may replace the word slot and may also replace the word summary.

Use env summary to generate an environmental summary of an entire system. Example 3-76 shows sample output.

Example 3-76. env summary Command Output

L2>env summary
all environmental conditions appear normal
L2>

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> env summary to display an environmental summary for specified rack number(s) and slot number(s).

        Note: For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, or two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.

help
Use the help command to generate a list of all of the system controller commands. Use the help <command> command to display more information on a single command. The variable <command> is the name of a command.

        Note: For this command, hlp may replace the word help.
For information about entering commands, see “Sending Commands to Specific Devices”.

ip
Use the following ip command set to set, clear, and show the L2 controller static IP address configuration settings.

ip

ip <addr> <netmask>

ip <addr> <netmask> <broadcast>

ip clear|reset

Use the ip command to display the L2 controller static IP address settings. Example 3-77 shows sample output.

Example 3-77. ip Command Output

essc1-001-L2>ip
addr: 137.38.88.197 netmask: 255.255.255.0 broadcast addr: 137.38.88.255
essc1-001-L2>

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use ip <addr> <netmask> to set the address and netmask L2 static IP configuration parameters.

Use ip <addr> <netmask> <broadcast> to set the address, netmask, and broadcast L2 static IP configuration parameters.

Use ip clear|reset to clear the L2 static IP address settings.

l1
The following l1 command set enters L1 mode or sends an L1 controller command to a specified L1 controller.

l1

rack <rng> slot <rng> l1

<rack>.<slot> l1

rack <rng> slot <rng> l1 <command>

<rack>.<slot> l1 <command>

<ip>:<port>:<l1> l1 <command>

:<port>:<l1> l1 <command>

l1 <command>

        Note: For these commands, the mnemonics r and s may replace the words rack and slot.

Use l1 to engage the default L1 command processor or enter the l1 mode.

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> l1 to engage the L1 command processor of a brick in a specified rack and slot. The <rng> variable following rack is one or more rack numbers, and the <rng> variable following slot is one or more slot numbers. Example 3-78 shows sample output.

        Note: For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, or two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.

Example 3-78. rack <rng> slot <rng> l1 Command Output

L2> r 1 s 19 l1
entering L1 mode 001r19, <CTRL-T> to escape to L2
 
001r19-L1>

Alternatively, you can use <rack>.<slot> l1 to engage the L1 command processor for a specified rack and slot.

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> l1 <command> to send a command to a destination brick without changing the default destination value. The <rng> variable following rack is one or more rack numbers, the variable <rng> following slot, is one or more slot numbers, and the variable <command> is an L1 controller command such as config. Example 3-79 shows sample output.

        Note: For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, or two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.

Example 3-79. rack <rng> slot <rng> l1 config Command Output

L2> r 1 s 7 l1 config
:0 - 001c07
:1 - 001i21
L2> 

Alternatively, you can use <rack>.<slot> l1 <command> to send a command to a destination brick without changing the default destination value.

Use <ip>:<port>:<l1> l1 <command> to send a command to a destination brick that does not yet have a brick identification number assigned to it. The variable <ip> is an IP address, the variable <port> is the port number, the variable <l1> is the L1 controller index number, and the variable <command> is an L1 controller command.

Use :<port>:<l1> l1 <command> to send a command to a destination brick that does not yet have a brick identification number assigned to it. The variable <port> is the port number, the variable <l1> is an L1 controller index number, and the variable <command> is an L1 controller command.

Use l1 <command> to send a specified L1 controller command to a default destination.

l2
Use the following l2 command set to engage and lock a specified L2 command processor or to send a command to specified L2 command processor(s).

l2

rack <rng> slot <rng> l2

rack <rng> slot <rng> l2 <command>

<ip> l2 <command>

        Note: For these commands, the mnemonics r and s may replace the word rack and slot.

Use the l2 command to engage and lock the L2 command processor. Example 3-80 shows sample output.

Example 3-80. l2 Command Output

L2> l2
L2 command processor engaged, <CTRL-D> for console mode.

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> l2 to engage a specified L2 controller. The <rng> variable specifies the rack number(s) and slot number(s).

        Note: For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, or two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.
Use rack <rng> slot <rng> l2 <command> to send a specified command to a specified L2 controller(s). Use <ip> l2 <command> to send a specified command to an L2 controller specified with its IP address.

l2find
The l2find command lists all of the L2 controllers that are connected together on the same subnet (see Example 3-81).

Example 3-81. l2find Command Output

L2>l2find
13 L2's discovered:

IP              SSN      NAME             RACK FIRMWARE
--------------- -------- ---------------- ---- ------------
[ L2's with System Serial Number NOT set ]
  137.38.82.101                            000 L3 controlle
  137.38.82.102                            000 L3 controlle
[ L2's with different System Serial Numbers ]
  137.38.82.156 L1000625                   001 1.8.0       
   137.38.82.51 N1000405 itsys1            111 1.7.7       
   137.38.82.58 L0000002 klsys2            002 1.7.7       
  137.38.82.159 L0000138 klsys4            004 1.7.9       
  137.38.82.162 L0000005 klsys5            005 1.7.7       
   137.38.82.57 L0000007 klsys7            007 1.8.0       
   137.38.82.55 L0000123 perch             009 1.7.7       
  137.38.82.158 L0000018 shrimp            018 1.7.7       
   137.38.82.50 N0000001 sn2-dbg2          022 1.7.7       
   137.38.82.52 M0000114 snapper           015 1.7.7       
  137.38.82.157 L0000119 whale             008 1.7.7 


l2display
Use the following l2display command set to set the functioning of your L2 controller touch display.

l2display debug <exp>

l2display debug

l2display enable

l2display disable

l2display

        Note: For these commands, l2dsp can replace l2display in your entries.

Use the commands in this set as follows:

Use l2display debug <exp> to set the L2 controller touch display to display the debug flags specified in <exp>.

Use l2display debug to show the L2 controller touch display debug flags.

Use l2display enable to enable the L2 controller touch display.

Use l2display disable to disable and lock the L2 controller touch display.

Use l2display to show whether the L2 controller touch display is locked.

log
The following log command set displays the contents of the log, resets the log, and writes an entry into the log.

log

log clear|reset

log insert <entry> 

Use the log command to view the contents of the log. If the log is empty, the output from the log command is log is empty.

Use log clear|reset to empty the log. Use log insert <entry> to write a line in the log. The variable <entry> is text to enter in the log. Example 3-82 shows sample output where the text for <entry> is “Start the Test.”

Example 3-82. log insert Start the Test Command Output

L2>log insert Start the Test
log entry made.


multisys
Use the following multisys command set to enable, disable, and show the settings for multiple system network sharing.

multisys

multisys on

multisys off

        Note: For these commands, msys can replace the word multisys.

Use the multisys command to view the current setting for the L2 controller multiple system network sharing. Example 3-83 shows sample output.

Example 3-83. multisys Command Output

L2>multisys
L2 multiple system network support enabled.
L2's will only connect to L2s with same system SN.
L2>

Use multisys on to enable multiple L2 controller system network sharing. Network sharing enables L2s to communicate only with other L2s that have the same serial number. Use multisys off to disable multiple L2 controller system network sharing. When L2 controller system network sharing is disabled, L2s communicate with all L2s.

nvram reset
The nvram reset command returns the NVRAM settings of the L2 controller to the factory default settings.

pbay
Use pbay config to report the bricks connected to each power bay. Use pbay <command> to send a specified command to one L1 controller connected to each power bay.

ping
Use the following ping command set to set the ping function between L2 controller and L2 controllers or L2 controller and L1 controllers.

ping

ping min <frequency in seconds>

ping max <frequency in seconds>

ping l2 <frequency in seconds>

ping sender <1 or 0>

ping l1 <frequency in seconds>

ping reset

Use the commands in this set as follows:

Use ping to display the L2 controller to L2 controller or L2 controller to L1 controller ping configurations.

Use ping min <frequency in seconds> to set the L2 controller to L2 controller ping response to a minimum specified in <frequency in seconds>.

Use ping max <frequency in seconds> to set the L2 controller to L2 controller ping response to a maximum specified in <frequency in seconds>.

Use ping l2 <frequency in seconds> to set the L2 controller to L2 controller ping frequency.

Use ping sender <1 or 0> to enable (1) or disable (0) sender ping as a valid response.

Use ping l1<frequency in seconds> to set L2 controller to L1 controller ping frequency in seconds.

Use ping reset to reset L2 controller to L2 controller and L2 controller to L1 controller ping configuration to default.

power
The following power command set displays the power status of the bricks and powers up and powers down the bricks.

power

power up

power down

rack <rng> slot <rng> power

rack <rng> slot <rng> power up

rack <rng> slot <rng> power down

power summary

rack <rng> slot <rng> power summary

power delay

power delay <milliseconds>

        Note: For the power command set, the mnemonics pwr, u, d, and s may replace the words power, up, down, and summary. The mnemonics r and s may replace the words rack and slot.

Use the power command to view the power status of each brick identified by the destination set of commands. Use the power up and power down commands to power up or power down each brick identified by the destination set of commands. Example 3-84 shows sample output.

Example 3-84. power Command Output

L2> power
001i21:
power appears on
001r19:
power appears on
001c07:
power appears on
001c10:
power appears on

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> power to view the power status of a specified brick. Use rack <rng> slot <rng> power up or rack <rng> slot <rng> power down to power up or power down specified bricks. The variable <rng> following rack is one or more rack numbers and the variable <rng> following slot is one or more slot numbers. Example 3-85 shows sample output.

Example 3-85. rack <rng> slot <rng> power Command Output

L2> r 1 s 19 power
power appears on

        Note: For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, or two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.

Use power summary to display a power status summary. Use rack <rng> slot <rng> power summary to display the power status summary for specified bricks. Example 3-86 shows sample output.

Example 3-86. power summary Command Output

L2>power summary
all 2 bricks appear powered off
margin: 1 default, 0 low, 0 normal, 0 high, 0 custom, 0 other
L2>

Use power delay to show the delay between power commands. Use power delay <milliseconds> to set the delay between power commands in milliseconds.

quit
Use the quit command to exit the L2 command processor.

rackid
Use the following rackid command set to display or set the L2 controller rack ID.

rackid

rackid <decimal exp>

Use the rackid command to display the rack ID of an L2 controller. Example 3-87 shows sample output.

Example 3-87. rackid Command Output

essc1-001-L2>rackid
rack ID is 001
essc1-001-L2>

Use rackid <decimal exp> to set the rack ID for an L2 controller, where <decimal exp> is the rack ID number for the L2 controller.

reboot_l2
The reboot_l2 command reboots the L2 controller using the newest firmware image. The reboot_l2 force command reboots the L2 controller even if the firmware image is invalid.

reset
Use the following reset command set to reset brick(s).

reset

rack <rng> slot <rng> reset

        Note: For the reset command set, you can use rst in the place reset, r in the place of rack, and s in the place of slot.

Use reset to reset the individual default brick or bricks.

        Caution: If you enter a reset command at the L2 prompt, it will reset all the bricks in your server system, which can create problems for your operating system if the operating system is running when you enter the reset command. So make sure your operating system is shut down before using the reset command.
Use rack <rng> slot <rng> reset to reset the bricks specified by the rack number(s) and slot number(s) specified with the variable <rng>.

        Note: For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, or two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.

select
The following select command set displays and sets the brick ID number of the compute brick and subchannel that receives console input.

select

select terse

select subchannel console

select subchannel <a|b|c|d>

select subchannel <exp>

select <exp> <exp>

select <rack>.<slot>

select reset

select partition <exp>

select filter on

select filter off

        Note: For this command set, the mnemonic sel, t, sub (or s), con, part (or p), res may replace the words select, terse, subchannel, console, partition, and reset.

Use the select command to view the brick ID number and subchannel that receives console input. Example 3-88 shows sample output. In this example, the brick ID is a C–brick in rack 2, slot 1 (002c01) and the subchannel is the console channel.

Example 3-88. select Command Output

L2> select 
console input: 002c01 console 
console output: not filtered 
console detection: L2 detected 

Alternatively, you can use select terse to provide a less detailed display of information identifying the brick ID number and the subchannel that receives the console input.

Use select subchannel console to select the current console as the subchannel of the brick that receives the console input. Use select subchannel <a|b|c|d> to select CPU a, b, c, or d of the brick that receives the console input. Alternatively, use select subchannel <exp> to select the subchannel CPU of the brick that receives that console input. In this command, the variable <a|b|c|d> is the subchannel letter (a, b, c, or d CPU) of the brick to receive the console input. Example 3-89 shows sample output.

Example 3-89. select subchannel <a|b|c|d> Command Output

L2> select subchannel c 
console input: 003c01 CPUc 
console output: not filtered 

console detection: L2 detected

Use select <rack>.<slot> to select the brick (brick ID) that receives console input. The variable <rack> is a rack number and the variable <slot> is a slot number. In Example 3-90, the brick ID is a C-brick in rack 3, slot 1 (003c01).

Example 3-90. select <rack>.<slot> Command Output

L2> select 3.1 
console input: 003c01 console 
console output: not filtered 
console detection: L2 detected 

Alternatively, use select <exp> <exp> to enter the rack and slot of the brick that receives the console input.

Use select reset to reset the selection of the brick to receive the console input to the default setting. Use select partition <exp> to select the partition and system console to receive the console input.

Use select filter on to turn the console output filter on, and select filter off to turn the console output filter off. Example 3-91 shows sample output.

Example 3-91. select filter on Command Output

L2> select filter on
console input: 003c01 console 
console output: filtered 

console detection: L2 detected

serial
Use the following serial command set to view and set the L2 controller system serial number.

serial

serial set <str>

Use the serial command to view the L2 controller system serial number. Example 3-92 shows sample output.

Example 3-92. serial Command Output

L2> serial
L2 system serial number: not set.

Use serial set <str> to set the L2 controller system serial number. The variable <str> is the L2 system serial number. Example 3-93 shows sample output.

Example 3-93. serial set <str> Command Output

L2> serial set L0000010
L2 system serial number set to L0000010.
L2> serial
L2 system serial number: L0000010.


shell
Use the shell command to escape to the L2 operating system. Example 3-94 shows sample output.

Example 3-94. shell Command Output

L2> shell
bash$ rm core
bash$ exit
exit
L2>

        Note: For this command, you may use the character ! instead of the word shell.


smp
The following smp command set displays the status of the system maintenance port (SMP) network connection. These commands are also used to join a specified SMP group or leave a current SMP group.

smp 

smp verbose

smp join <exp>

smp leave

        Note: For this command set, the mnemonic v may replace the word verbose.

Use the smp command to view the status of the SMP network connection. Example 3-95 shows a sample output.

Example 3-95. smp Command Output

essc1-001-L2>smp
Session  Who     Group   Mode    Console
------- -------------   -----   ----    -----------------------
>>>    6       network port    6       L2      038c01 console (default)
        1       modem port      1       L2      038c01 console (default)
        1       modem port      1       L2      038c01 console (default)

essc1-001-L2>

Use smp verbose to display an expanded status of the SMP network connection.

Use smp join <exp> to join a specified SMP group identified by the <exp> variable. Use the smp leave command to leave the current SMP group.

sysname
Use the following sysname command set to display or set the system name (name of the L2 controller).

sysname

sysname <str>

Use the sysname command to display the name of the system. Example 3-96 shows a sample output.

Example 3-96. sysname Command Output

essc1-001-L2>sysname
L2 system name : essc1.
essc1-001-L2>

Use sysname <str> to set a system name where the variable <str> is the system name. Example 3-97 shows sample output.

Example 3-97. sysname <str> Command Output

essc1-001-L2>sysname essc2
L2 system name : essc2.

essc2-001-L2>

version
Use the following version command set to view information about the L1 and L2 controller firmware versions running in the system controller.

version

l1 version

version verbose

version summary

version check

rack <rng> slot <rng> version summary

rack <rng> slot <rng> version check

        Note: For this command, ver may replace the word version, v may replace verbose, s may replace summary, c may replace check, r may replace rack, and s may replace slot.

The version command displays the L2 controller firmware version currently running in the system controller, as shown in Example 3-98.

Example 3-98. version Command Output

L2> version
L2 version 0.4.0

Use the other commands in this set as follows:

Use l1 version to view the L1 controller firmware version currently running in the system controller.

Use version verbose to display the verbose view of the L2 controller firmware version currently running in the system controller.

Use version summary to display a summary of the L1 and L2 controller firmware versions currently running in the system controller.

Use version check to display any L1 and L2 controller firmware version mismatches in the system.

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> version summary to display the L1 and L2 controller firmware versions currently running in the rack(s) and slot(s) that you specify with the <rng> variable following rack and the <rng> variable following slot.

Use rack <rng> slot <rng> version summary to display the L1 and L2 controller firmware versions mismatches in the rack(s) and slot(s) that you specify with the <rng> variable following rack and the <rng> variable following slot.

        Note: For the <rng> variable, you can enter a single number, or two numbers separated by a hyphen to indicate a range, or numbers separated by commas to indicate separate items. For <rng>, you can also enter an asterisk or the word “all” to select all the items available.

Example session

L1001231-001-L2>ver
L2 version: 1.36.0
L1001231-001-L2>serial
L2 system serial number: L1001231.
L1001231-001-L2>



L1001231-001-L2>1.25 l1
entering L1 mode 001r25, <CTRL-T> to escape to L2

001r25-L1>ver
L1 1.40.4 (Image B), Built 09/29/2005 13:42:59    [Base 1MB image]
001r25-L1>serial all

Data                            Location      Value
------------------------------  ------------  --------
Local System Serial Number      NVRAM         L1001241
Reference System Serial Number  Attached L2   L1001231
Local Brick Serial Number       EEPROM        MHR829
Reference Brick Serial Number   NVRAM         MHR829


EEPROM      Product Name    Serial         Part Number           Rev  T/W   
----------  --------------  -------------  --------------------  ---  ------
POWER       RPWR            MHR829         030_1631_002          E    00   
LOGIC       ROUTER          LGP402         030_1634_002          B    00   

001r25-L1>




L1001231-001-L2>reboot_l2   
will reboot in 5 seconds...
INIT: Switching to runlevel: 6
Sending processes the TERM signal
Restartinÿ

Validating L2 Controller Flash image....OK
Booting...


Ethernet address from Motorola VPD EEPROM is 08:00:69:11:B1:77

Linux/PPC load:
Uncompressing Linux...done.
Now booting the kernel
Linux version 2.4.7-sgil2 (dsd@tstorm) (gcc version 2.95.2 19991030 (2.95.3 prerelease/franzo)) #1 Mon Feb 28 14:51:03 CST 2005
On node 0 totalpages: 4096
zone(0): 4096 pages.
zone(1): 0 pages.
zone(2): 0 pages.
Kernel command line: root=/dev/ram panic=5
Decrementer Frequency = 187500000/60
Calibrating delay loop... 49.76 BogoMIPS
Memory: 11904k available (952k kernel code, 512k data, 180k init, 0k highmem)
Dentry-cache hash table entries: 2048 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
Inode-cache hash table entries: 1024 (order: 1, 8192 bytes)
Mount-cache hash table entries: 512 (order: 0, 4096 bytes)
Buffer-cache hash table entries: 1024 (order: 0, 4096 bytes)
Page-cache hash table entries: 4096 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
POSIX conformance testing by UNIFIX
PCI: Probing PCI hardware
I/O resource not set for host bridge 0
Memory resource not set for host bridge 0
PCI: Cannot allocate resource region 0 of PCI bridge 0
PCI: resource is 80000000..7fffffff (100), parent c011c314
PCI:00:04.0: Resource 0: c0000000-c0000fff (f=200)
PCI:00:05.0: Resource 0: c0001000-c0001fff (f=200)
Linux NET4.0 for Linux 2.4
Based upon Swansea University Computer Society NET3.039
Starting kswapd v1.8
i2c-core.o: i2c core module
i2c-dev.o: i2c /dev entries driver module
i2c-core.o: driver i2c-dev dummy driver registered.
i2c-algo-8xx.o: i2c mpc8xx algorithm module
i2c-rpx.o: i2c RPX Lite/MBX module
i2c-dev.o: Registered 'rpx' as minor 0
i2c-core.o: adapter rpx registered as adapter 0.
Console: switching to frame buffer device
fb0:  SGI L2 (SED137x LCD controller) frame buffer device
fb0:  Display panel [mono]: Hantronix HDM3224 (320x240, 4-bit Greyscale)
CPM UART driver version 0.03
ttyS00 at 0x0000 is a SCC
ttyS01 at 0x0100 is a SCC
ttyS02 at 0x0200 is a SCC
ttyS03 at 0x0300 is a SCC
WDT_8xx: Software Watchdog Timer version 0.3, 30 second timeout
block: queued sectors max/low 7810kB/2603kB, 64 slots per queue
RAMDISK driver initialized: 16 RAM disks of 4096K size 1024 blocksize
eth0: FEC ENET Version 0.1, 08:fec: Phy @ 0x0, type 0x78100003
fec: link down
00:fec: 10 Mbps, Half-Duplex
69:11:b1:77
PowerPC realtime clock driver, version 0.1.
usb.c: registered new driver usbdevfs
usb.c: registered new driver hub
PCI: Enabling device 00:04.0 (0000 -> 0002)
usb-ohci.c: USB OHCI at membase 0xc2002000, IRQ 8
usb-ohci.c: usb-00:04.0, PCI device 11c1:5802 (Lucent Microelectronics)
usb.c: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 1
Product: USB OHCI Root Hub
SerialNumber: c2002000
hub.c: USB hub found
hub.c: 2 ports detected
PCI: Enabling device 00:05.0 (0000 -> 0002)
usb-ohci.c: USB OHCI at membase 0xc2004000, IRQ 10
usb-ohci.c: usb-00:05.0, PCI device 11c1:5802 (Lucent Microelectronics)
usb.c: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 2
Product: USB OHCI Root Hub
SerialNumber: c2004000
hub.c: USB hub found
hub.c: 2 ports detected
usb-ohci.c: v5.2:USB OHCI Host Controller Driver
usb.c: registered new driver sgil1
usb.c: registered new driver sgil1
usb.c: registered new driver sgil1
sgil1.c: SGI L1 controller support registered
NET4: Linux TCP/IP 1.0 for NET4.0
IP Protocols: ICMP, UDP, TCP, IGMP
IP: routing cache hash table of 512 buckets, 4Kbytes
TCP: Hash tables configured (established 1024 bind 1024)
NET4: Unix domain sockets 1.0/SMP for Linux NET4.0.
RAMDISK: cramfs filesystem found at block 0
RAMDISK: overriding ramdisk block size to 4096 for cramfs filesystem
RAMDISK: Loading 2012 blocks [1 disk] into ram disk... done.
Freeing initrd memory: 2012k freed
VFS: Mounted root (cramfs filesystem).
Freeing unused kernel memory: 180k init
INIT: version 2.77 booting
cp: /rhosts.allow: No such file or directory
Starting DHCP client daemon....
hub.c: USB new device connect on bus1/1, assigned device number 2
Manufacturer: Silicon Graphics, Inc.
Product: SN1 L1 System Controller
SerialNumber: 00000000
sgil1.c: SGI L1 connected, minor: 64 device: 1.2
hub.c: USB new device connect on bus1/2, assigned device number 3
hub.c: USB hub found
hub.c: 7 ports detected
hub.c: USB new device connect on bus1/2/1, assigned device number 4
Manufacturer: Silicon Graphics, Inc.
Product: SN1 L1 System Controller
SerialNumber: 00000000
sgil1.c: SGI L1 connected, minor: 65 device: 1.4
hub.c: USB new device connect on bus1/2/2, assigned device number 5
usb.c: USB device not accepting new address=5 (error=-110)
hub.c: USB new device connect on bus1/2/2, assigned device number 6
usb.c: USB device not accepting new address=6 (error=-110)
hub.c: USB new device connect on bus1/2/4, assigned device number 7
Manufacturer: Silicon Graphics, Inc.
Product: SN1 L1 System Controller
SerialNumber: 00000000
sgil1.c: SGI L1 connected, minor: 66 device: 1.7
hub.c: USB new device connect on bus1/2/5, assigned device number 8
Manufacturer: Silicon Graphics, Inc.
Product: SN1 L1 System Controller
SerialNumber: 00000000
sgil1.c: SGI L1 connected, minor: 67 device: 1.8
dhcpcd[28]: timed out waiting for a valid DHCP server response

INFO: No DHCP server found, starting local DHCP server (to serve L3 clients).
INFO: DHCP: new IP address is 10.17.177.119
INIT: Entering runlevel: 5


SGI L2 Controller
Current L2 version: 1.36.0 (L2 emulator: 1.36.0)
Flashed L2 version: 1.36.0

INFO: opened USB control /dev/sgil1_cs
INFO: opened USB device at b1;p1;d2 (/dev/sgil1_0)
INFO: opened USB device at b1;p2/1;d4 (/dev/sgil1_1)
INFO: opened USB device at b1;p2/4;d7 (/dev/sgil1_2)
INFO: opened USB device at b1;p2/5;d8 (/dev/sgil1_3)
INFO: SMP listening on port: 8001
INFO: attempting connection to localhost:9002

INFO: auto power up appears enabled
INFO: attempting connection to localhost:9002
INFO: auto power up in 30 seconds...
L1001231-001-L2>INFO: Validating connection from 'localhost' (127.0.0.1)
INFO: connection to localhost:9002 established.
INFO: Validating connection from 'localhost' (127.0.0.1)
INFO: connection to localhost:9002 established.
INFO: Connection - sgi (sgi) @ localhost running 'l2flash'.
INFO: Connection - sgi (sgi) @ localhost running 'l2gui'.
INFO: attempting connection to localhost:9002
INFO: Validating connection from 'localhost' (127.0.0.1)
INFO: connection to localhost:9002 established.
INFO: Connection - sgi (sgi) @ localhost running 'l2part'.
INFO: auto power up in 25 seconds...
INFO: auto power up in 20 seconds...
INFO: auto power up in 15 seconds...
INFO: auto power up in 10 seconds...
INFO: auto power up in  5 seconds...
INFO: initiating auto power up.
ERROR: auto power up error.
001r25ERROR: SerNum:System Serial Number mismatch. See log for details.
001c01ERROR: SerNum:System Serial Number mismatch. See log for details.
001c02ERROR: SerNum:System Serial Number mismatch. See log for details.
001c03ERROR: SerNum:System Serial Number mismatch. See log for details.
001c01ERROR: power appears off.
001c02ERROR: power appears off.
001c03ERROR: power appears off.
001r25ERROR: power appears off.

L1001231-001-L2>serial all
001c01:

Data                            Location      Value
------------------------------  ------------  --------
Local System Serial Number      NVRAM         M2001411
Reference System Serial Number  Attached L2   L1001231
Local Brick Serial Number       EEPROM        KJD687
Reference Brick Serial Number   NVRAM         KJD687


EEPROM      Product Name    Serial         Part Number           Rev  T/W   
----------  --------------  -------------  --------------------  ---  ------
NODE        IP45_4CPU       KJD687         030_1797_001          B    00   
IO8         IO8             MHL579         030_1673_003          E    00   

EEPROM     JEDEC-SPD Info           Part Number        Rev  Speed  SGI     
---------- ------------------------ ------------------ ---- ------ --------
DIMM 0     CE0000000000000026051400 M3 46L2820BT1-CA0   0B    8.0  N/A     
DIMM 2     CE000000000000000C7D8000 M3 46L2820DT2-CA0   2D   10.0  N/A     
DIMM 1     7F7FFE000000000012000092 CM2201B             2     8.0  N/A     
DIMM 3     7F7FFE000000000012000151 CM2201B             2     8.0  N/A     

001c02:

Data                            Location      Value
------------------------------  ------------  --------
Local System Serial Number      NVRAM         M2001411
Reference System Serial Number  Attached L2   L1001231
Local Brick Serial Number       EEPROM        MLJ194
Reference Brick Serial Number   NVRAM         MLJ194

EEPROM      Product Name    Serial      Part Number           Rev  T/W   
----------  --------------  ----------  --------------------  ---  ------
NODE        IP45_4CPU       MLJ194      030_1779_001          C    00   
IO8         IO8             MLG164      030_1673_003          F    00   

EEPROM      JEDEC Info                Part Number         Rev  Speed (ns)
----------  ------------------------  ------------------  ---  ----------
DIMM 0      7F7FFE000000000012000145  CM2201B             2     08.0
DIMM 2      7F7FFE000000000012000141  CM2201B             2     08.0
DIMM 1      CE0000000000000026061400  M3 46L2820BT1-CA0   0B    08.0
DIMM 3      CE000000000000000C698000  M3 46L2820DT2-CA0   2D    10.0

001c03:

Data                            Location      Value
------------------------------  ------------  --------
Local System Serial Number      NVRAM         M2100226
Reference System Serial Number  Attached L2   L1001231
Local Brick Serial Number       EEPROM        MJN491
Reference Brick Serial Number   NVRAM         MJN491

EEPROM      Product Name    Serial      Part Number           Rev  T/W   
----------  --------------  ----------  --------------------  ---  ------
NODE        IP45_4CPU       MJN491      030_1728_002          D    00   
IO8         IO8             MHR530      030_1673_003          F    00   

EEPROM      JEDEC Info                Part Number         Rev
----------  ------------------------  ------------------  ---
DIMM 0      10000000000000002E015A00  444BH               2
DIMM 2      100000000000000034015A00  444BH               2
DIMM 1      10000000000000006E005A00  444BH               2
DIMM 3      10000000000000000A015A00  444BH               2

001r25:

Data                            Location      Value
------------------------------  ------------  --------
Local System Serial Number      NVRAM         L1001241
Reference System Serial Number  Attached L2   L1001231
Local Brick Serial Number       EEPROM        MHR829
Reference Brick Serial Number   NVRAM         MHR829


EEPROM      Product Name    Serial         Part Number           Rev  T/W   
----------  --------------  -------------  --------------------  ---  ------
POWER       RPWR            MHR829         030_1631_002          E    00   
LOGIC       ROUTER          LGP402         030_1634_002          B    00   

L1001231-001-L2>
L1001231-001-L2> 1.1 l1     
entering L1 mode 001c01, <CTRL-T> to escape to L2

001c01-L1>serial all

Data                            Location      Value
------------------------------  ------------  --------
Local System Serial Number      NVRAM         M2001411
Reference System Serial Number  Attached L2   L1001231
Local Brick Serial Number       EEPROM        KJD687
Reference Brick Serial Number   NVRAM         KJD687


EEPROM      Product Name    Serial         Part Number           Rev  T/W   
----------  --------------  -------------  --------------------  ---  ------
NODE        IP45_4CPU       KJD687         030_1797_001          B    00   
IO8         IO8             MHL579         030_1673_003          E    00   

EEPROM     JEDEC-SPD Info           Part Number        Rev  Speed  SGI     
---------- ------------------------ ------------------ ---- ------ --------
DIMM 0     CE0000000000000026051400 M3 46L2820BT1-CA0   0B    8.0  N/A     
DIMM 2     CE000000000000000C7D8000 M3 46L2820DT2-CA0   2D   10.0  N/A     
DIMM 1     7F7FFE000000000012000092 CM2201B             2     8.0  N/A     
DIMM 3     7F7FFE000000000012000151 CM2201B             2     8.0  N/A     

001c01-L1>ver
L1 1.30.14 (Image B), Built 08/05/2004 11:09:57    [Base 1MB image]
001c01-L1>
L1001231-001-L2>1.2 l1
entering L1 mode 001c02, <CTRL-T> to escape to L2

001c02-L1>serial all

Data                            Location      Value
------------------------------  ------------  --------
Local System Serial Number      NVRAM         M2001411
Reference System Serial Number  Attached L2   L1001231
Local Brick Serial Number       EEPROM        MLJ194
Reference Brick Serial Number   NVRAM         MLJ194

EEPROM      Product Name    Serial      Part Number           Rev  T/W   
----------  --------------  ----------  --------------------  ---  ------
NODE        IP45_4CPU       MLJ194      030_1779_001          C    00   
IO8         IO8             MLG164      030_1673_003          F    00   

EEPROM      JEDEC Info                Part Number         Rev  Speed (ns)
----------  ------------------------  ------------------  ---  ----------
DIMM 0      7F7FFE000000000012000145  CM2201B             2     08.0
DIMM 2      7F7FFE000000000012000141  CM2201B             2     08.0
DIMM 1      CE0000000000000026061400  M3 46L2820BT1-CA0   0B    08.0
DIMM 3      CE000000000000000C698000  M3 46L2820DT2-CA0   2D    10.0

001c02-L1>ver
L1 1.12.6 (Image B), Built 04/22/2002 08:13:40    [1MB image]
001c02-L1>

L1001231-001-L2>1.3 l1
entering L1 mode 001c03, <CTRL-T> to escape to L2

001c03-L1>serial all

Data                            Location      Value
------------------------------  ------------  --------
Local System Serial Number      NVRAM         M2100226
Reference System Serial Number  Attached L2   L1001231
Local Brick Serial Number       EEPROM        MJN491
Reference Brick Serial Number   NVRAM         MJN491

EEPROM      Product Name    Serial      Part Number           Rev  T/W   
----------  --------------  ----------  --------------------  ---  ------
NODE        IP45_4CPU       MJN491      030_1728_002          D    00   
IO8         IO8             MHR530      030_1673_003          F    00   

EEPROM      JEDEC Info                Part Number         Rev
----------  ------------------------  ------------------  ---
DIMM 0      10000000000000002E015A00  444BH               2
DIMM 2      100000000000000034015A00  444BH               2
DIMM 1      10000000000000006E005A00  444BH               2
DIMM 3      10000000000000000A015A00  444BH               2

001c03-L1>ver
L1 1.8.4 (Image B), Built 10/30/2001 11:47:34    [P1 support]
001c03-L1>