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Revision as of 15:17, 8 April 2009 by Regan russell (Talk | contribs) (Provide a small code segment)

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People here are not clairvoyants. This topic is meant as a collection of things to provide on forums when asking questions.


Any posts concerning pirated software or offering to buy/sell/trade commercial software are subject to removal.

How to ask good questions

The following link is a good guide on how to ask good meaningful directed questions in any online community: http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

Do some reasearch

  • Search the nekochan forums.. There is a good chance that topic has been covered in the past, your might want to extend a recent topic with a yes that would work but my set up is a little different type post.
  • Read / search techpubs.sgi.com
  • Use google or yahoo and gather any information relevant.
  • Read the nekochan wiki.
  • Take a Screenshot or photo of hardware.
  • (Slightly advanced) search sgi.com for available patches that might match your O/S version and problem. eg. a Panic with both CPUs in network processes might be a reason to download and apply a patch which resolves network crashes.

Provide a hinv

Include a link to your hardware inventory (hinv) posted in the hinv sub forum. You have posted your hinv in the hinv forum right?

Provide a stack trace

Program crashes can be more easily determined if people know where things went wrong.

  bash$ dbx `which myapp` core
  dbx> where

Assuming my app is a program in your path you have an issue with and the core file is in the current directory.


System panics cause writing of data in files in /var/adm/crash by the Savecore process.

Provide log messages

/var/adm/log/SYSLOG often provides information related to problems.


Provide a small code segment

If it is a programming problem, a brief description of language features that are a problem not including the language or compiler used will confuse the reader. Best to include a code segment less than 5 to 10 lines of what the MIPS Pro compiler is complaining about.

eg

 struct foo
 {
   int x;
   int y
   char tmplte[0];   /** Works on gcc **/
 }

The above example is should be change to "char *tmplte;" .. The [0] thing is a weird way to declare a pointer.

See also getting rid of GCC-isms.

Have a good attitude

Everything here is volunteer. No one owes you anything. No one is responsible if you destroy anything after taking advice from here.

Leave the information on the forum. Don't delete your question post after someone answers it. It helps someone else find an answer.

A troll is a post meant to inflame tensions amongst posters. Not particularly helpful. Posts attacking IRIX and SGI hardware might put people offside. If you are keen on Linux, there is a linux/MIPS mailing list and a plethora of Linux forums.


From "How To Be A Hacker"

  4. Help keep the infrastructure working
  The hacker culture (and the engineering development of the Internet, for that matter) is run by volunteers. 
  There's a lot of necessary but unglamorous work that needs done to keep it going — 
  administering mailing lists, moderating newsgroups, maintaining large software archive sites, developing RFCs and other technical standards.
  People who do this sort of thing well get a lot of respect, because everybody knows these jobs are huge time sinks and not as much fun as playing with code. 
  Doing them shows dedication.
  5. Serve the hacker culture itself
  Finally, you can serve and propagate the culture itself (by, for example, writing an accurate primer on how to become a hacker ). 
  This is not something you'll be positioned to do until you've been   around for while and become well-known for one of the first four things.
   The hacker culture doesn't have leaders, exactly, but it does have culture heroes and tribal elders and historians and spokespeople. 
    When you've been in the trenches long enough, you may grow  into one of these. 
    Beware: hackers distrust blatant ego in their tribal elders, so visibly reaching for this kind of fame is dangerous. 
   Rather than striving for it, you have to sort of position yourself so  it drops in your lap, and then be modest and gracious about your status.


See Also

  • Nekochan topic [1]